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Elena Hall - Marinela

Diversity of CBT-based interventions promoting resources in physical health: from face-to-face to digital interventions

Lucia Romo, Romina Recabarren, Stéphanie Haymoz, Katharina Ledermann, Maria Alejandra Laszcz Speaker

Chair:
Prof. Dr. Lucia Romo, Département des Sciences Psychologiques, EA 4430 CLIPSYD Clinique Psychanalyse Développement, University of Paris Nanterre, France
Prof. Dr. Chantal Martin-Soelch, Unit of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Fribourg, Switzerland

Convenor:
Prof. Dr. Chantal Martin-Soelch, Unit of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Fribourg, Switzerland

Stream: Behavioral Medicine and Health       

Martin-Soelch, Chantal (convenor and chair),1; Romo, Lucia (chair), 2; Recabarren, Romina (speaker), 1; Haymoz, Stéphanie (speaker), 1,3; Ledermann, Katharina (speaker), 1,4 ; Laszcz, Maria Alejandra, 5 (speaker) 

1)  Unit of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Fribourg, Switzerland; 
2) Département des Sciences Psychologiques, EA 4430 CLIPSYD Clinique Psychanalyse Développement, University of Paris Nanterre, France; 
3) Clinique de la Source, Lausanne, Switzerland; 
4) University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland; 
5) Clinique des Maladies Mentales et de l’Encéphale, Centre Hospitalier Sainte-Anne, Paris, France

The aim of this symposium is to present different types of CBT-based interventions and their research outcomes in the field of physical health with a specific focus on interventions promoting individual resources. The management and prevention of chronic physical diseases, e.g. obesity, chronic pain, cardio-vascular problems are challenging issues for healthcare systems. Current clinical guidelines stress the importance of psychosocial interventions in this context; and interventions using cognitive-behavioral methods have proved to be useful. CBT-based interventions in the context of chronic diseases were shown to increase physical and mental health as well as life quality in patients with chronic physical diseases. Used in a preventive way, resource-activating CBT-interventions support lifestyle changes, reducing the individual probability to develop chronic health problems. This symposium aims to illustrate the great methodological heterogeneity of CBT-based interventions in physical health, and present on-going works performed by young women scientists in France and Switzerland. The first talk will present the outcomes of a preventive CBT-based group intervention for stress management using multimodal intervention methods. In the second talk, the outcomes of a group intervention focusing on the promotion of emotional skills, and its use in individuals with obesity will be presented. The third talk will describe the development of a smartphone application to offer a personalized pain management treatment in chronic pain patients. The last talk will present a smartphone-based intervention for individuals with eating disorders. Overall, this symposium aims to illustrate the diversity and the effects of CBT-based interventions in physical health.

Presenters and presentation titles:


1) MSc. Romina Evelyn Recabarren, Unit of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Fribourg, Switzerland.
Title: Strong against stress. Effects of a multidimensional stress prevention program on psychological resources and physical indicators of well-being in university students

University students report increased levels of stress than the general population of the same age, which may be associated with an increased risk for psychological problems. Depression, anxiety, substance abuse, sleep- and eating problems were often reported by university students. The effectiveness of cognitive, behavioral, and mindfulness interventions focusing on stress prevention among university students was evidenced. However, these programs are based generally in one way to cope with stress. This study aimed to investigate the impact of a multidimensional stress prevention program on stress perception, quality of life, psychological resources and physical indicators in university students.
A randomized controlled trial study was applied to compare pre- and post outcomes in an experimental group compared to a waiting-list control group. Sixty-four university students were randomly distributed in both groups. The experimental group followed an eight-weekly stress prevention program based on well-validated approaches, integrating cognitive-behavioral strategies with mindfulness-based exercises, emotional regulation strategies, social skills training and assertiveness activities. Before and after the participation in the program, both groups answered online questionnaires about their psychological and physical well-being. We expected the students in the experimental group to have lower perceived stress perception and a reduction of psychological problems indicators after their participation in the program, compared to the control group. As well as an increase in quality of life and an improvement in psychological resources. Preliminary results will be presented.


2) Dr. Phil. Stéphanie Haymoz, Clinique de la Source, Lausanne, Switzerland & Unit of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Fribourg, Switzerland.
Title: Working on emotions to better manage weight: Emotional-Openness-based group intervention in the context of overweight treatment

Emotional food consumption has long been recognized as an etiological factor of overweight and obesity (Kaplan & Kaplan, 1957). Given the difficulties overweight patients face in regulating their eating behavior, it is crucial to offer adapted psychotherapeutic interventions focused on emotional processing. Thus, we proposed a six-session manual-based group program focused on the model of Emotional Openness (Reicherts, 1999; Reicherts et al., 2012), whose efficacy with non-clinical subjects was shown in previous research (Haymoz, 2014). The model highlights five components: cognitive representation of emotions, perception of internal and external bodily indicators, communication and regulation of emotions. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the efficacy of the program on a small number of overweight patients with a three-point measurement design on their eating behavior, affective treatment, and on their BMI. Faced with the poor results of psychological treatments for overweight and obesity, it is important to benefit from an efficient and effective manual-based program.


3) Dr. Phil. Katharina Ledermann, Department of Psychosomatics and Consiliar psychiatry, University Hospital Zurich, University Zurich, Switzerland & Unit of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Fribourg, Switzerland.
Title: Development of a smartphone application for the treatment of chronic pain in older adults based on the daily life experience of pain

The global population is ageing rapidly. Chronic pain is one of the most distressing and debilitating health issues faced by people over 65. The burden of unrelieved pain experienced by older people and its associated high symptom and economic costs demands consideration of new strategies to better this condition. As the global uptake of digital technology increases, exploring its potential to impact positively on older people’s pain self-management practices warrants investigation. The aim of this presentation is to demonstrate a new approach for the assessment of chronic pain in older adults by a mobile electronic system consisting of an application for pain self-assessment and self-monitoring by means of a pain diary as well as attached sensors to gain a better understanding of the interaction of psychological and biological factors influencing the pain perception in older people. First results from our pilot study will be presented. Furthermore, the implementation of smartphone applications in the cognitive behavioral treatment of older people will be discussed and advantages and eventual problems that could arise with the use of this new technology critically reflected.


4) Maria Alejandra Laszcz, Clinique des Maladies Mentales et de l’Encéphale, Centre Hospitalier Sainte-Anne, Paris, France
Title: Development of a Smartphone Application for the Treatment of Eating Disorders

The global population is ageing rapidly. Chronic pain is one of the most distressing and debilitating health issues faced by people over 65. The burden of unrelieved pain experienced by older people and its associated high symptom and economic costs demands consideration of new strategies to better this condition. As the global uptake of digital technology increases, exploring its potential to impact positively on older people’s pain self-management practices warrants investigation. The aim of this presentation is to demonstrate a new approach for the assessment of chronic pain in older adults by a mobile electronic system consisting of an application for pain self-assessment and self-monitoring by means of a pain diary as well as attached sensors to gain a better understanding of the interaction of psychological and biological factors influencing the pain perception in older people. First results from our pilot study will be presented. Furthermore, the implementation of smartphone applications in the cognitive behavioral treatment of older people will be discussed and advantages and eventual problems that could arise with the use of this new technology critically reflected.